cole lyman CS, Bioinformatics & Life

Honoring Pi Day

Honoring Pi Day

Honoring Pi Day

Preface: This is a throwback from some years ago (circa 2012) when I was a Senior in high school, and was in honor of Pi Day. Enjoy!

Honoring Pi Day

Preface: This is a throwback from some years ago (circa 2012) when I was a Senior in high school, and was in honor of Pi Day. Enjoy!


π It is romantic, infinite, enigmatic, and yet so simple. It can be discovered by taking the area of a circle, and dividing that by the square of its radius. It has fooled may intellectual men and women throughout the ages, and still today. I will do a little manipulation of π (and hopefully not be committing mathematical heresy) with the advent of π day.

As many know π can be known as 3.14159265… Which would mean that the most accurate π day would have been on March 14, 1592. So, going off this, if π changed every year according to the date, what mathematical effects would this bring?

To illustrate this I will use one of the most basic uses of π, finding the area of a circle. For ease of understanding, our circle will have a radius of 1. Reach back to third grade and remember the formula for the area of a circle A=π r2. Which means that if our radius (r)=1, then the area will be π or 3.141592.

Now let’s have some fun.

If we modify π to change every year, π would equal 3.142012 this year and next year it would equal 3.142013 and so on for eternity. The repercussions of this would be that circles with a radius of 1, would be 0.00042 units2 larger than the ‘true’ π day back in 1592. Even though this is a mere 0.013369018% increase in size and a 0.000001 unit increase per year, it could still be a pretty big deal (ok, not really). It would take 6,000 years, if this pattern is continued, for the ‘area’ of a circle to double (go from 1 unit2 to 2 units2). The year would be 7592, and every circle (where radius is equal to 1) that you would encounter would conceptually be twice the size… Crazy to think about.

But thankfully π is constant, or is it since it is infinite?

Happy π day.

-Cole

He that has an ear let him hear

“He that has an ear, let him hear”

“He that has an ear, let him hear”

15 April 2016

“He that has an ear, let him hear”

15 April 2016

Many times in John’s writing of Revelation he says the phrase “he that has an ear, let him hear.” This phrase may seem like it is stating the obvious, and could be interpreted as unnecessary literary fluff, but it reality it has deep meaning. Whenever this phrase appears it signals the read to be prepared to interpret what is said next because it is meant to be symbolic.

The phrase itself has an added meaning to me. Almost all of us have ears that can hear, or eyes that can read, but how many of us use them for these purposes? Is God trying to speak with us? If so, are you listening?

If we feel that God isn’t speaking to us or that we aren’t learning from the scriptures, maybe it is that we aren’t hearing. May all of us that have ears hear what we need to hear.

-Cole

Neither cold nor hot I would thou wert cold or hot

“Neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot”

“Neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot”

09 April 2016

“Neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot”

09 April 2016

(Photo credit Leon Mauldin)

In modern-day Turkey there is a city called Laodicea. One of the attributes of this city that stands out the most in modern times is its water distribution system. Not because of its effectiveness, but rather because of its ineffectiveness. Because of where Laodicea was situated in relation to the water source, by the time the water from the hot springs reached Laodicea, it was lukewarm. The temperature of the water was optimal for bacteria to grow, which in turn clogged the pipes of Laodicea (see picture). Had the water been warmer, or colder, the pipes would not have been clogged.

Spiritual Pipes

John was not referring to the effectiveness of Laodicea’s water system when he wrote “Thou art neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot” (Revelation 3:15). He prefaced this with “I know thy works” (Revelation 3:15); John was referring to the spiritual temperature of the Laodiceans.

How can one be spiritually hot or cold? Is there a spiritual lukewarm? I believe that in reality spirituality is a binary matter, meaning that there is no true middle ground. We may say what we believe, but we show what we truly believe through what we do. In the end, we are either on Christ’s side or we are not. Those that say that they are on His side, but show otherwise may be considered to be lukewarm.

When we are lukewarm the spiritual water that flows from God to us is inhibited. We do not act on the promptings that are given to us, and the flow of water will gradually be diminished to a mere trickle. Distractions and temptations will pile up and clog our spiritual pipes. Let us always be spiritually warm, that the living water that we receive may always flow with abundance.

-Cole